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Christopher Trauco

Purchase New Intermediate Camera vs. Older Professional

As someone recently in a similar position (but not going to college to study the subject), can I suggest?

You will learn much more about photography in general by using film rather than (or as well as) digital. Digital is good too, but film teaches you more. It is these days not expensive - you can buy a good quality 35mm film SLR for well under £200/€200. If you start with black-and-white film you can develop it at home yourself very easily and cheaply, then scan the negatives into your computer.

As for digital, whilst I think mirrorless interchangeable lens cameras are the future there's no doubt that right now conventional digital SLRs are the best, most flexible and probably cheapest way other than point-and-shoot bridge cameras (some of which are actually very good). I'd wait for MILC technology to stabilise before investing large amounts of money in it.

It is NOT about equipment, it is about you. In fact, I'd recommend restricting yourself to cheaper, simpler kit because it is this that will bring out the creativity, part of which is working round the limitations of what the camera and lens will allow you to portray. Thousands of Euros of equipment won't make you a better photographer, whereas a good photographer can get excellent images from a disposable camera. Note especially that film is less susceptible to technological advance than digital, the fundamentals not having changed for decades.

I'd suggest buying a used camera. Digital technology changes rapidly, so what today costs €10,000 tomorrow will be a few hundred in a second-hand shop. An "outdated" digital SLR will still produce perfectly good images capable of printing at A3 size or even larger. You don't really need more than about 10-12 megapixels unless you're doing exhibition size prints.

Lenses are more important than the camera. If you can afford it, buy a film and a digital SLR of the same brand so you can use the same lenses on both. Since I started using my father's AE-1 in the 1970s, my preference is for Canon, but Nikon is just as good, it's simply a matter of personal preference. Both have a very wide selection of lenses. Get a Canon EOS 35mm SLR and you can use modern EF-type autofocus lenses. The range of usable Nikon lenses is even greater since their old film and current digital models (largely) use the same lens mount design, whereas Canon changed from FD to EF in 1987 and the two are not interchangeable.

Not knowing enough about Nikon or other types, I would make Canon-specific recommendations so - a Canon 700D or 70D crop-frame digital SLR if you want new, or a used 450D for cheapness; a Canon EOS 3, 30 or 33 film SLR; the EF 50mm f/1.8 prime lens because it is cheap and optically good; a macro lens of 100mm focal length; a modest telephoto zoom; a wide-angle if you want interesting perspectives. You say video appeals to you - the Canon 70D is very good for video, especially coupled with some of the EF-S lenses with STM focusing motors. If you want old-school everything manual still photography, then get a Canon AE-1 and some FD type lenses.

But most of all, enjoy.
29.04.15, 00:03
As someone recently in a similar position (but not going to college to study the subject), can I suggest?

You will learn much more about photography in general by using film rather than (or as well as) digital. Digital is good too, but film teaches you more. It is these days not expensive - you can buy a good quality 35mm film SLR for well under £200/€200. If you start with black-and-white film you can develop it at home yourself very easily and cheaply, then scan the negatives into your computer.

As for digital, whilst I think mirrorless interchangeable lens cameras are the future there's no doubt that right now conventional digital SLRs are the best, most flexible and probably cheapest way other than point-and-shoot bridge cameras (some of which are actually very good). I'd wait for MILC technology to stabilise before investing large amounts of money in it.

It is NOT about equipment, it is about you. In fact, I'd recommend restricting yourself to cheaper, simpler kit because it is this that will bring out the creativity, part of which is working round the limitations of what the camera and lens will allow you to portray. Thousands of Euros of equipment won't make you a better photographer, whereas a good photographer can get excellent images from a disposable camera. Note especially that film is less susceptible to technological advance than digital, the fundamentals not having changed for decades.

I'd suggest buying a used camera. Digital technology changes rapidly, so what today costs €10,000 tomorrow will be a few hundred in a second-hand shop. An "outdated" digital SLR will still produce perfectly good images capable of printing at A3 size or even larger. You don't really need more than about 10-12 megapixels unless you're doing exhibition size prints.

Lenses are more important than the camera. If you can afford it, buy a film and a digital SLR of the same brand so you can use the same lenses on both. Since I started using my father's AE-1 in the 1970s, my preference is for Canon, but Nikon is just as good, it's simply a matter of personal preference. Both have a very wide selection of lenses. Get a Canon EOS 35mm SLR and you can use modern EF-type autofocus lenses. The range of usable Nikon lenses is even greater since their old film and current digital models (largely) use the same lens mount design, whereas Canon changed from FD to EF in 1987 and the two are not interchangeable.

Not knowing enough about Nikon or other types, I would make Canon-specific recommendations so - a Canon 700D or 70D crop-frame digital SLR if you want new, or a used 450D for cheapness; a Canon EOS 3, 30 or 33 film SLR; the EF 50mm f/1.8 prime lens because it is cheap and optically good; a macro lens of 100mm focal length; a modest telephoto zoom; a wide-angle if you want interesting perspectives. You say video appeals to you - the Canon 70D is very good for video, especially coupled with some of the EF-S lenses with STM focusing motors. If you want old-school everything manual still photography, then get a Canon AE-1 and some FD type lenses.

But most of all, enjoy.
385 clicks
hinizturgay

hi all, I need some advices about canon lenses.10-22 or 16-3

You must be using a crop sensor camera as the 10-22 is an EF-S lens and foes not fit the full frame cameras (like 5d).
with a crop sensor you must know that using an EF (not EF-S) means a multiplier of 1.6 to the focal length. So the 16-35 (which is a favorite of mine) becomes a 25-56. These are not close enough to do the same functions. The costs are not similar either as a 10-22 is a about $650 new and the 16-35 is about $1000 more. If you are beginning I suggest limiting the expense until you find your voice. Then spend resources there. You may find an specialty that pleases you and those lenses may be completely different than where you began.


Post Edited (14:56)[/quote]
848 clicks
Timothy Cifers

Tripod and ballhead

I agree
14.02.14, 20:24
I agree
2,176 clicks
Tom Schimmelpfennig

PRO 8-3 Robert Mehlan 1512779 - Family Business

Pro
16.12.13, 12:31
Pro
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