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Discussion Last answer Replies / Clicks
mariah

Help me to learn product photography

14.06.22, 18:52
2,342 clicks
Geovanna Bravomalo

The techniques of victimization in photojournalism

Hello everyone :)

Need a little help with a small research that I am conducting about media visual representations and Old Age Poverty in South Korea. The main objective of this study is to show how the visual portrayals of the South Korean mass media are “misrepresenting” the phenomena of elder rubbish collection in South Korea. This, by placing the narratives of the elders as the central subject of study (which I argue is a contrasting one with the "victim" portrayal).

The agency and the inherent value that I assume this work (rubbish collection) have for this elder generation, goes further than just as a coping system for daily survival; it has an inherent value for them, it makes them feel they are still active and contributing to some extend through their work. In that sense, I want to show how the “victim” portrayal that the mass media creates, is actually a misrepresentation of what this group of people really feel and think about themselves and the work they perform in their daily lives.

In order to conduct this study, I plan to first select some of the media visual representations that show “victimization” in relation to the subject in the photo (in this case is elder rubbish collector(s)). Second, I plan to conduct a series of interviews with the rubbish collector. Through this process I would like to show him the selected photos from media and talk about how far this photo relates with himself.

Since I aim also to give the space in this study for them to “visually talk”, apart from his narratives, I ‘ll apply Gideon Mendel’s approach “a live documentary space”, used in 1990’s to promote the media coverage of the people who lived with HIV-AIDS in Africa. A given frame will be given to this rubbish collector, and he may chose the object, landscape or subject that he thinks better represent himself, as a human being and most importantly, as an “elder rubbish collector” in South Korea.

Having explained this, I would really like to know if there is the possibility that you share with me your personal and professional perspective in regard to media representations and victimization.

As I’ve been reading, one of the essays that caught my attention was Nigel Warburton’s in the book “Media Ethics”. The ideas that he appoints in this specific essay is the importance in the usage of the “aesthetic devices” in photo documentary or photojournalism. Warburton emphasizes that these “tools” help to construct powerful images that simultaneously encourage readers to accept a particular meaning of a certain image. In that sense, I got to understand that before choosing an image to show to my interviewee, I had to thoroughly understand how the media represents “victimization”. Furthermore, I also got to understand the importance of knowledge on the usage of photography techniques to produce that message in photojournalism. Based on those ideas, I wonder:

1. Based on your professional experiences, what would you appoint as the techniques of victimization in photojournalism or photo documentation?
What I mean by asking this is: how can one actually judge and chose what is in an artistic and technical bases, intended to show the photographed subject as a victim?


Many thanks in advance!
14.09.20, 15:13
Hello everyone :)

Need a little help with a small research that I am conducting about media visual representations and Old Age Poverty in South Korea. The main objective of this study is to show how the visual portrayals of the South Korean mass media are “misrepresenting” the phenomena of elder rubbish collection in South Korea. This, by placing the narratives of the elders as the central subject of study (which I argue is a contrasting one with the "victim" portrayal).

The agency and the inherent value that I assume this work (rubbish collection) have for this elder generation, goes further than just as a coping system for daily survival; it has an inherent value for them, it makes them feel they are still active and contributing to some extend through their work. In that sense, I want to show how the “victim” portrayal that the mass media creates, is actually a misrepresentation of what this group of people really feel and think about themselves and the work they perform in their daily lives.

In order to conduct this study, I plan to first select some of the media visual representations that show “victimization” in relation to the subject in the photo (in this case is elder rubbish collector(s)). Second, I plan to conduct a series of interviews with the rubbish collector. Through this process I would like to show him the selected photos from media and talk about how far this photo relates with himself.

Since I aim also to give the space in this study for them to “visually talk”, apart from his narratives, I ‘ll apply Gideon Mendel’s approach “a live documentary space”, used in 1990’s to promote the media coverage of the people who lived with HIV-AIDS in Africa. A given frame will be given to this rubbish collector, and he may chose the object, landscape or subject that he thinks better represent himself, as a human being and most importantly, as an “elder rubbish collector” in South Korea.

Having explained this, I would really like to know if there is the possibility that you share with me your personal and professional perspective in regard to media representations and victimization.

As I’ve been reading, one of the essays that caught my attention was Nigel Warburton’s in the book “Media Ethics”. The ideas that he appoints in this specific essay is the importance in the usage of the “aesthetic devices” in photo documentary or photojournalism. Warburton emphasizes that these “tools” help to construct powerful images that simultaneously encourage readers to accept a particular meaning of a certain image. In that sense, I got to understand that before choosing an image to show to my interviewee, I had to thoroughly understand how the media represents “victimization”. Furthermore, I also got to understand the importance of knowledge on the usage of photography techniques to produce that message in photojournalism. Based on those ideas, I wonder:

1. Based on your professional experiences, what would you appoint as the techniques of victimization in photojournalism or photo documentation?
What I mean by asking this is: how can one actually judge and chose what is in an artistic and technical bases, intended to show the photographed subject as a victim?


Many thanks in advance!
1,893 clicks
Ken Piros

Some advice for the beginner

09.07.19, 21:09
23,388 clicks
Audrius Mer

Beginner tips for selling your photos

Hi,

I want to share some info on how to make it in stock photography even if you're a beginner!

I have been in stock photography for about 4 years. I am a contributor of 6 stock agencies:

Shutterstock:
http://submit.shutterstock.com/?ref=1865198

Fotolia:
http://www.fotolia.com/partner/204297204

123RF:
http://www.123rf.com/#audriusmerfeldas

Deposit photos:
http://depositphotos.com?ref=1756291

Dreamstime:
http://www.dreamstime.com/register#res6959677

But actually I have found that Shutterstock works best for me and generates stable income. There are a few difficulties that you may face during registration process:

For when Shutterstock exams your first uploaded batch of photos:

don't worry if you don't pass on the first try, it happens very often. Carefully read the information they provide about examining the photos and try again. If you don't pass, you may need to wait for a while before trying again. Also, for your first photo batch, try to upload various photos with different subjects. Many people struggle with this because of a few reasons:

*Check there are no people in the photo if you don't have model release (document that the person in photo allows you to sell photos of them).

*Check there is no advertising or trademarks that might be subject to copyright (even manufacturer name on a kitchen knife is subject to copyright for example, so be carefull and photoshop it out)

*Check the exposure: your photo should be not overexposed or underexposed, even if you think that it gives mood to the photo. Such photo will probably not be accepted.

*Check that there is no vissible grain or noise. Inspect the photo at 100% size. That's how Shutterstock checks them.

For me, Shutterstock is no. 1 in stock photography. I like 123RF too because they don't delete rejected photos, so you have all the keywords archived. For me, 123RF earns low but stable income, and they also usually accept more photos than other stock agencies.

Hope this helped, good luck in stock photography!
11.08.18, 14:39
Hi,

I want to share some info on how to make it in stock photography even if you're a beginner!

I have been in stock photography for about 4 years. I am a contributor of 6 stock agencies:

Shutterstock:
http://submit.shutterstock.com/?ref=1865198

Fotolia:
http://www.fotolia.com/partner/204297204

123RF:
http://www.123rf.com/#audriusmerfeldas

Deposit photos:
http://depositphotos.com?ref=1756291

Dreamstime:
http://www.dreamstime.com/register#res6959677

But actually I have found that Shutterstock works best for me and generates stable income. There are a few difficulties that you may face during registration process:

For when Shutterstock exams your first uploaded batch of photos:

don't worry if you don't pass on the first try, it happens very often. Carefully read the information they provide about examining the photos and try again. If you don't pass, you may need to wait for a while before trying again. Also, for your first photo batch, try to upload various photos with different subjects. Many people struggle with this because of a few reasons:

*Check there are no people in the photo if you don't have model release (document that the person in photo allows you to sell photos of them).

*Check there is no advertising or trademarks that might be subject to copyright (even manufacturer name on a kitchen knife is subject to copyright for example, so be carefull and photoshop it out)

*Check the exposure: your photo should be not overexposed or underexposed, even if you think that it gives mood to the photo. Such photo will probably not be accepted.

*Check that there is no vissible grain or noise. Inspect the photo at 100% size. That's how Shutterstock checks them.

For me, Shutterstock is no. 1 in stock photography. I like 123RF too because they don't delete rejected photos, so you have all the keywords archived. For me, 123RF earns low but stable income, and they also usually accept more photos than other stock agencies.

Hope this helped, good luck in stock photography!
17,763 clicks
marilyn777

Some help with settings for Macro Photography

14.07.18, 15:27
4,452 clicks
Anila Jain

19 ways to become a hated photographer

Human beings seem to think that we are gonna take their photograph, positioned it in an ad, and make a gazillion greenbacks off of it, and they won't get a say inside the count, an awful lot much less a reduction of the $. Oh, if only that were proper. This isn't always certainly paranoia, as photogs and editors used to be plenty much less careful about releases. Nowadays no editor worth the pay will receive a photograph without a replica of the discharge, no matter what the use (besides news.) information is specifically exempted with the aid of case law within us - any individual sued and lost, but in Canada, a launch is required for the newspaper. I do not know about European law. Well-known human beings are exempt from the release regulation, however, regular people are not.
22,755 clicks
VEBUR

Digital versus Film

04.09.17, 12:09
5,516 clicks
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