Analog and chemical photography, films, darkroom
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Sheila Young

White eye reflection in children's photos

Actually my goal in getting in to your site was to advance my
campaign to let people know about the "white eye" reflection in children's
and babies' photographs (instead of the typical red eye). This white eye is
a tell tale sign of eye disease! In some cases, being alert to this sign
can save a baby's eyesight, or, even his life. I am trying any way I can to
try to spare other babies and children the devastating circumstance that
befell my infant grandson, James.
Born January 25th this year, he lost his left eye to save his life on May
4th. A retinoblastoma tumor had already detached his retina and threatened
quick metastasis to his brain and spine. If we had been alert to this sign,
a photo at 4 weeks of age would have sent us urgently to the doctor to have
his eyes examined! That would have caught this tumor in an earlier stage
an, probably, saved his eye from having to be removed. We discounted the
white 'spark" in his left eye as a reflection of the track lighting in his
home. Looking at the photo in retrospect, we enlarged it and saw clearly
that it was not a spark, but the dreaded sign of "leukocoria" that is eye
disease, in his case, retinoblastoma, an aggressive childhood cancer.
The fact that this mutilation was totally preventable is heart-wrenching and
moves us to try to warn others of this phenomenon.
We are also working hard to have it become a standard of care in the medical
community to dilate babies' and children's eyes in the hospital nurseries
and at their well baby/well child doctor visits and use and opthalmoscope in
a darkened room to examine their eyes as a screening test for eye disease.
This is an easy way to avoid the devastating loss of vision caused by
delayed detection eye disease.
Any help you can give on spreading this word would be greatly appreciated!
Granny Sheila Young
sheila.young3@sbcglobal.net

Forum List | Threaded View
05.07.05, 19:17
Actually my goal in getting in to your site was to advance my
campaign to let people know about the "white eye" reflection in children's
and babies' photographs (instead of the typical red eye). This white eye is
a tell tale sign of eye disease! In some cases, being alert to this sign
can save a baby's eyesight, or, even his life. I am trying any way I can to
try to spare other babies and children the devastating circumstance that
befell my infant grandson, James.
Born January 25th this year, he lost his left eye to save his life on May
4th. A retinoblastoma tumor had already detached his retina and threatened
quick metastasis to his brain and spine. If we had been alert to this sign,
a photo at 4 weeks of age would have sent us urgently to the doctor to have
his eyes examined! That would have caught this tumor in an earlier stage
an, probably, saved his eye from having to be removed. We discounted the
white 'spark" in his left eye as a reflection of the track lighting in his
home. Looking at the photo in retrospect, we enlarged it and saw clearly
that it was not a spark, but the dreaded sign of "leukocoria" that is eye
disease, in his case, retinoblastoma, an aggressive childhood cancer.
The fact that this mutilation was totally preventable is heart-wrenching and
moves us to try to warn others of this phenomenon.
We are also working hard to have it become a standard of care in the medical
community to dilate babies' and children's eyes in the hospital nurseries
and at their well baby/well child doctor visits and use and opthalmoscope in
a darkened room to examine their eyes as a screening test for eye disease.
This is an easy way to avoid the devastating loss of vision caused by
delayed detection eye disease.
Any help you can give on spreading this word would be greatly appreciated!
Granny Sheila Young
sheila.young3@sbcglobal.net

Forum List | Threaded View
499 clicks
Uncel Photomanhattan

Photography Class as gift

hi, i am a new comer in this photography field, so i would like to know type of film suitable for event.

like an example:

when i use slide (fuji velvia 50) in daylight i found it is extraordinary good, the colour is full fill and more deeper than the ordinary flim (fuji 100 or fuji 200), but when i use the slide for indoor with built in flash the result is not same when is in outdoor. why is that happened??

and there is many slide around the market, like fuji provia 100, fuji sensia, kodak chrome, and can any one actually tell me the advantage of each flim, which flim is the best for certain event.

and also can introduce some web site that have this kind of comparison for the flim.


please do post this message to the web base because i think everyone would like to know....
2,876 clicks
Uncel Photomanhattan

Ever wondered what elements make a good photograph?

"HOW TO USE THE MANUAL OPTIONS OF YOUR CAMERA". Free!!!!
To all of you who put your camera on automatic all the time!: Learn to craft the image you want instead of what the camera's programmers want. Each short session will consist of an introduction to the use of the manual controls on cameras, covering use of aperture, shutter speed and the camera's light meter.
Thursday December 2: 7-9pm
Bring your camera!

"PHOTO COMPOSITION" $15
Ever wondered what elements make a good photograph?
Through image analysis, participants will be taught the basic image design techniques.
Thursday December 9: 7-9pm
Bring your pictures!! (Optional)

"B&W PORTRAIT" $15
Looking to photograph people? This interactive photo shoot workshop will introduce you to the basic lighting and composition techniques for B&W portraits.
Thursday December 16: 7-9pm
Bring your camera and a 3200 ISO film!

www.photomanhattan.com
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