General Discussions and Small Talk
Discussion Last answer Replies / Clicks
The8ighthPower

Powerful End Time Photographic Images Displayed By God.

What you are about to see are images of the Living God displayed in the heavens, and captured with a digital camera by God's anointed, Mrs. Teresa Brown Hogan.
This is the "True and Living Ministry" of God. She is Chosen by God, in this end time, to be a "Light" to those who "sit in darkness".
Jesus (The Living Word of God) is here!
These Images are not even a "fraction" of what is going on in the heavens and captured by Teresa by the power of God, coming with Power and Great Glory!
These images are only a few of the countless ones you will witness in her series of books, "The 8th Power".
This is her plight, her destiny in this Earth, ordained by God, even before the foundations of the world.
Whether or not you believe what you are about to see, or even "receive" it, just know that,
LIFE IS ABOUT TO CHANGE AS YOU KNOW IT!
GRACE AND MERCY BE WITH YOU ALL!!

Feel Free To View My Profile!
446 clicks
koreanair20

: 2013 Korean Airline Travel Photo Contest

Theme : Pleasant and memorable travel moment (unpublished work from both domestic and overseas)

Eligibility : Anyone who likes travel and photography

Details
■ Photo Size
- Digital Camera Photo : All accepted
- Film Camera Photo : Black and White or Color printed photo, <11 X 14> inch
※ a. not digitally enhanced or manipulated
b. winners must send the original image (must be over 3,000 pixels)
c. but, smart-life winner should submit original image photographed by smart device
(m.photo.koreanair.com)

■ Contest Submission
- Visit to photo.koreanair.com to download the application form.
After completing the form, please save it and send as an attachment.
※ Color printed photo submission is available via mail or in person
(Please be sure to fill in your phone number and name above the entry)
※ Reception Office Address : HS Ad & Korean Air Travel Photo Contest Office, 12F LG Mapo Bldg.,
Gongduk-2dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul, Korea (Zip code : 121-721)

■ Maximum Number of Submission : Five per entrant (for both online and mail submissions)
※ Five entries can be submitted additionally for smart-life prize sector




Standard for the award
■ Grand prix prize ~ Selected work: a photo of a memorable travel moment
■2gether Prize: picture about family, friend, lovers, colleage, relatiomship with others, friendship, etc.
■Smart- life prize: picture and story about concerned with 20 in your life. It for celebrate 20th Korean Air Travel Photo contest.



Results Announcement /
Awards
■ Announcement : The winners will be announced on October 1 (Tue) at our online contest gallery (photo.koreanair.com) and Hankook Ilbo, and will also be notified individually by e-mail. ※ Announcement date may be changed due to schedules

■ Awards Ceremony : Oct 15(Tue), 2013 11:00 AM. ilwoo space, Korean Air Building in Seosomoon, Seoul

■ Prizes
- Grand Prix Prize (1) : A trophy and two Prestige Class round trip tickets to any Korean Air destination
+ two domestic Economy Class round trip tickets
- Gold Prize(1) : A trophy and two Prestige Class round trip tickets to any Korean Air destination
- Silver Prize(2) : A trophy and two Economy Class round trip tickets to any Korean Air destination
- Bronze Prize(6) : A trophy and two Economy Class round trip tickets to one of Korean Air destinations
(Between Korea-Japan or China or Southeast Asia)
※ Americas/Europe residence will be offered one round trip tickets between Korea-Americas or Europe
- Meritorious Prize (50): A certificate and two domestic(Korea) Economy Class round trip tickets
- 2gether Prize(5): A certificate and Cannon Digital Camera (Models?has not been?decided?yet)
- Smart-life prize(5) : A certificate and Cannon Digital Camera (Models?has?not been?decided?yet)


※ If foreigner awards grand prix, gold, silver, bronze or meritorious prize there will be separate notification.
※ The grand prix, gold, silver, and bronze prize winners will attend the Awards Ceremony to receive their awards.
In case of participant who is unable to attend, a family or a relative with verifiable identity can receive the award


Exhibition / Period
■ Seoul -Ilwoo Space (10.15 ~ 10.21)
■ Busan ? Yongdusan Arts Gallery (10.24 ~ 10.29)
■ Daejeon-Time world Gallery (11.14 ~ 11.19)
■ Jeju ? Korean Air Jeju brench 1st floor lobby (11.27~12.3)
■ Gwangju- Gallery D (12.12 ~ 12.18)
■ Daegu ?Daebaek-Praza Gallery (12.24 ~ 12.29)
※ Each exhibition will be closed on Holidays


Rules
1) All copyrights of winning photos will belong to Korean Air. 2) Awards will be cancelled for any entry which is imitated, composed, counterfeited, retouched, or have been awarded at any other competition.
3) The winning entrants should submit the original film (for film photo) and the original downloaded file (for digital photo) within the requested time period.
4) All submitted entries will not be returned.
5) The supplementary prizes (tickets) are non-transferable except for direct family members. ※ The above details may be subjected to change depending on the detailed schedule.
Please visit the website for further information http://photo.koreanair.com/


Etc
Hosted by Korean Air
Sponsored by Hankook Ilbo and Canon
Organized by Korean Air and HSAd
04.07.13, 07:18
Theme : Pleasant and memorable travel moment (unpublished work from both domestic and overseas)

Eligibility : Anyone who likes travel and photography

Details
■ Photo Size
- Digital Camera Photo : All accepted
- Film Camera Photo : Black and White or Color printed photo, <11 X 14> inch
※ a. not digitally enhanced or manipulated
b. winners must send the original image (must be over 3,000 pixels)
c. but, smart-life winner should submit original image photographed by smart device
(m.photo.koreanair.com)

■ Contest Submission
- Visit to photo.koreanair.com to download the application form.
After completing the form, please save it and send as an attachment.
※ Color printed photo submission is available via mail or in person
(Please be sure to fill in your phone number and name above the entry)
※ Reception Office Address : HS Ad & Korean Air Travel Photo Contest Office, 12F LG Mapo Bldg.,
Gongduk-2dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul, Korea (Zip code : 121-721)

■ Maximum Number of Submission : Five per entrant (for both online and mail submissions)
※ Five entries can be submitted additionally for smart-life prize sector




Standard for the award
■ Grand prix prize ~ Selected work: a photo of a memorable travel moment
■2gether Prize: picture about family, friend, lovers, colleage, relatiomship with others, friendship, etc.
■Smart- life prize: picture and story about concerned with 20 in your life. It for celebrate 20th Korean Air Travel Photo contest.



Results Announcement /
Awards
■ Announcement : The winners will be announced on October 1 (Tue) at our online contest gallery (photo.koreanair.com) and Hankook Ilbo, and will also be notified individually by e-mail. ※ Announcement date may be changed due to schedules

■ Awards Ceremony : Oct 15(Tue), 2013 11:00 AM. ilwoo space, Korean Air Building in Seosomoon, Seoul

■ Prizes
- Grand Prix Prize (1) : A trophy and two Prestige Class round trip tickets to any Korean Air destination
+ two domestic Economy Class round trip tickets
- Gold Prize(1) : A trophy and two Prestige Class round trip tickets to any Korean Air destination
- Silver Prize(2) : A trophy and two Economy Class round trip tickets to any Korean Air destination
- Bronze Prize(6) : A trophy and two Economy Class round trip tickets to one of Korean Air destinations
(Between Korea-Japan or China or Southeast Asia)
※ Americas/Europe residence will be offered one round trip tickets between Korea-Americas or Europe
- Meritorious Prize (50): A certificate and two domestic(Korea) Economy Class round trip tickets
- 2gether Prize(5): A certificate and Cannon Digital Camera (Models?has not been?decided?yet)
- Smart-life prize(5) : A certificate and Cannon Digital Camera (Models?has?not been?decided?yet)


※ If foreigner awards grand prix, gold, silver, bronze or meritorious prize there will be separate notification.
※ The grand prix, gold, silver, and bronze prize winners will attend the Awards Ceremony to receive their awards.
In case of participant who is unable to attend, a family or a relative with verifiable identity can receive the award


Exhibition / Period
■ Seoul -Ilwoo Space (10.15 ~ 10.21)
■ Busan ? Yongdusan Arts Gallery (10.24 ~ 10.29)
■ Daejeon-Time world Gallery (11.14 ~ 11.19)
■ Jeju ? Korean Air Jeju brench 1st floor lobby (11.27~12.3)
■ Gwangju- Gallery D (12.12 ~ 12.18)
■ Daegu ?Daebaek-Praza Gallery (12.24 ~ 12.29)
※ Each exhibition will be closed on Holidays


Rules
1) All copyrights of winning photos will belong to Korean Air. 2) Awards will be cancelled for any entry which is imitated, composed, counterfeited, retouched, or have been awarded at any other competition.
3) The winning entrants should submit the original film (for film photo) and the original downloaded file (for digital photo) within the requested time period.
4) All submitted entries will not be returned.
5) The supplementary prizes (tickets) are non-transferable except for direct family members. ※ The above details may be subjected to change depending on the detailed schedule.
Please visit the website for further information http://photo.koreanair.com/


Etc
Hosted by Korean Air
Sponsored by Hankook Ilbo and Canon
Organized by Korean Air and HSAd
431 clicks
Ken Piros

Monthly Theme Topics for 2013 by Month

.
25.06.13, 12:46
.
917 clicks
FlashSpark

Wedding in the Rain

It has been raining non-stop for weeks and there is no sign of it stopping any time soon.
I have booked a very last second wedding for tomorrow and this will be the first wedding I expect to shoot in full rain, all day. And believe me, they want to be outside for it. I have scouted as many alternative indoor locations as I could and googled tips for full outdoor weddings until I felt that I had thoroughly prepared myself for nearly 5 hours of outdoor shots.

So I will be wrapping my cameras in rain sleeves, wearing my favourite rain jacket and I just hope that nature will bless us with photogenic mist, fog and moody clouds (and hey--maybe no rain while we're at it!)

I will let you folks know how it goes! In the mean time if you have any last second tips I would love to hear them!
443 clicks
Glenn Capers

the rights of your images faces new laws

UK.Gov passes Instagram Act: All your pics belong to everyone now

Everyone = Silicon Valley ad platforms tech companies
By Andrew Orlowski • Get more from this author

Posted in Media, 29th April 2013 07:27 GMT
Have you ever uploaded a photo to Facebook, Instagram or Flickr?

If so, you'll probably want to read this, because the rules on who can exploit your work have now changed radically, overnight.

Amateur and professional illustrators and photographers alike will find themselves ensnared by the changes, the result of lobbying by Silicon Valley and radical bureaucrats and academics. The changes are enacted in the sprawling Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Act which received Royal Assent last week, and it marks a huge shift in power away from citizens and towards large US corporations.

How so? Previously, and in most of the world today, ownership of your creation is automatic, and legally considered to be an individual's property. That's enshrined in the Berne Convention and other international treaties, where it's considered to be a basic human right. What this means in practice is that you can go after somebody who exploits it without your permission - even if pursuing them is cumbersome and expensive.

The UK coalition government's new law reverses this human right. When last year Instagram attempted to do something similar, it met a furious backlash. But the Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Act has sailed through without most amateurs or semi-professionals even realising the consequences.

The Act contains changes to UK copyright law which permit the commercial exploitation of images where information identifying the owner is missing, so-called "orphan works", by placing the work into what's known as "extended collective licensing" schemes. Since most digital images on the internet today are orphans - the metadata is missing or has been stripped by a large organisation - millions of photographs and illustrations are swept into such schemes.

For the first time anywhere in the world, the Act will permit the widespread commercial exploitation of unidentified work - the user only needs to perform a "diligent search". But since this is likely to come up with a blank, they can proceed with impunity. The Act states that a user of a work can act as if they are the owner of the work (which should be you) if they're given permission to do so by the Secretary of State.

The Act also fails to prohibit sub-licensing, meaning that once somebody has your work, they can wholesale it. This gives the green light to a new content-scraping industry, an industry that doesn't have to pay the originator a penny. Such is the consequence of "rebalancing copyright", in reality.

What now?
Quite what happens next is not clear, because the Act is merely enabling legislation - the nitty gritty will come in the form of statutory instruments, to be tabled later in the year. Parliament has not voted down a statutory instrument since 1979, so the political process is probably now a formality.

In practice, you'll have two stark choices to prevent being ripped off: remove your work from the internet entirely, or opt-out by registering it. And registration will be on a work-by-work basis.

"People can now use stuff without your permission," explained photo rights campaigner Paul Ellis. "To stop that you have to register your work in a registry - but registering stuff is an activity that costs you time and money. So what was your property by default will only remain yours if you take active steps, and absorb the costs, if it is formally registered to you as the owner."

And right now, Ellis says, there's only one registry, PLUS. Photographers, including David Bailey, condemned the government for rushing through the legislation before other registries - such as the Copyright Hub - could sort themselves out.

"The mass of the public will never realise they've been robbed," thinks Ellis. The radical free-our-information bureaucrats at the Intellectual Property Office had already attempted to smuggle orphan works rules through via the Digital Economy Act in 2010, but were rebuffed. Thanks to a Google-friendly Conservative-led administration, they've now triumphed.

Three other consequences appear possible.

One is a barrage of litigation from UK creators - and overseas owners who find their work Hoovered into extended collective licensing programs. International treaties allow a country to be ostracised and punished. The threat has already been made clear from US writers and photographers, who've promised "a firestorm". Reciprocal royalty arrangements can also be suspended, on the basis of "if you steal our stuff, UK, we won't pay you". In addition, a judicial review, based on the premise that the Act gives Minister unconstitutional power over the disposal of private property, is not out of the question.

Secondly, the disappearance of useful material from the internet is likely to accelerate - the exact opposite of what supporters wish for. We recently highlighted the case of an aerial photographer who's moving work outside the UK, and we've heard of several who are taking their photos away from the web, and into lockers. The internet is poorer without a diverse creative economy - because creators need legal certainty of property rights.

And finally, there's the macroeconomic consequences for the UK economy.

The notorious 'Google Review' chaired by Ian Hargreaves failed to undertake adequate impact assessments, a giveaway that even the most rabid "copyright reformers" recognise there isn't an economic case to be made for taking everyone's stuff and giving it away.

"There's value in works, and if anybody can exploit them except the person who creates them, then value is transferred to the exploiter," explains Ellis. "This is a massive value transfer out of the UK economy to US tech companies."

Where it will remain, he thinks, because UK tech/media companies - should they appear - almost invariably become US-owned.

Copyright "reformers" of course rarely like to talk about such unpleasant matters - and will steer the conversation away from economic consequences as rapidly as possible. Indeed, the they generally talk using Orwellian euphemisms - like "liberalising" or "rebalancing" copyright. It's rarely presented as an individual's ability to go to market being removed. This is what "copyright reform" looks like in practice.

"It's corporate capitalism," says Ellis. "Ideally you want to empower individuals to trade, and keep the proceeds of their trade. The UK has just lost that."

So while the Twitterati and intelligentsia were ranting away about "Big Content", we've just lost the ability to sell our own content. In other words, you've just been royally fucked. ®

READ MORE Facebook Flickr Copyright Uk.Gov Instagram

WHAT YOU NEED TO DO IS NOW READ THE BELOW FOR SOME ANSWERS AND WATCH THE YOUTUBE VIDEO AT TE BOTTOM.
If you want to register your work start by putting in all your information into your files from your camera menu. This includes your full name, address, phone number then in adobe bridge add image title with image file number, make sure your date is on. The more you set up in your camera menu the less you have to do.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WlLS7cUiFeQ
01.05.13, 22:58
UK.Gov passes Instagram Act: All your pics belong to everyone now

Everyone = Silicon Valley ad platforms tech companies
By Andrew Orlowski • Get more from this author

Posted in Media, 29th April 2013 07:27 GMT
Have you ever uploaded a photo to Facebook, Instagram or Flickr?

If so, you'll probably want to read this, because the rules on who can exploit your work have now changed radically, overnight.

Amateur and professional illustrators and photographers alike will find themselves ensnared by the changes, the result of lobbying by Silicon Valley and radical bureaucrats and academics. The changes are enacted in the sprawling Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Act which received Royal Assent last week, and it marks a huge shift in power away from citizens and towards large US corporations.

How so? Previously, and in most of the world today, ownership of your creation is automatic, and legally considered to be an individual's property. That's enshrined in the Berne Convention and other international treaties, where it's considered to be a basic human right. What this means in practice is that you can go after somebody who exploits it without your permission - even if pursuing them is cumbersome and expensive.

The UK coalition government's new law reverses this human right. When last year Instagram attempted to do something similar, it met a furious backlash. But the Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Act has sailed through without most amateurs or semi-professionals even realising the consequences.

The Act contains changes to UK copyright law which permit the commercial exploitation of images where information identifying the owner is missing, so-called "orphan works", by placing the work into what's known as "extended collective licensing" schemes. Since most digital images on the internet today are orphans - the metadata is missing or has been stripped by a large organisation - millions of photographs and illustrations are swept into such schemes.

For the first time anywhere in the world, the Act will permit the widespread commercial exploitation of unidentified work - the user only needs to perform a "diligent search". But since this is likely to come up with a blank, they can proceed with impunity. The Act states that a user of a work can act as if they are the owner of the work (which should be you) if they're given permission to do so by the Secretary of State.

The Act also fails to prohibit sub-licensing, meaning that once somebody has your work, they can wholesale it. This gives the green light to a new content-scraping industry, an industry that doesn't have to pay the originator a penny. Such is the consequence of "rebalancing copyright", in reality.

What now?
Quite what happens next is not clear, because the Act is merely enabling legislation - the nitty gritty will come in the form of statutory instruments, to be tabled later in the year. Parliament has not voted down a statutory instrument since 1979, so the political process is probably now a formality.

In practice, you'll have two stark choices to prevent being ripped off: remove your work from the internet entirely, or opt-out by registering it. And registration will be on a work-by-work basis.

"People can now use stuff without your permission," explained photo rights campaigner Paul Ellis. "To stop that you have to register your work in a registry - but registering stuff is an activity that costs you time and money. So what was your property by default will only remain yours if you take active steps, and absorb the costs, if it is formally registered to you as the owner."

And right now, Ellis says, there's only one registry, PLUS. Photographers, including David Bailey, condemned the government for rushing through the legislation before other registries - such as the Copyright Hub - could sort themselves out.

"The mass of the public will never realise they've been robbed," thinks Ellis. The radical free-our-information bureaucrats at the Intellectual Property Office had already attempted to smuggle orphan works rules through via the Digital Economy Act in 2010, but were rebuffed. Thanks to a Google-friendly Conservative-led administration, they've now triumphed.

Three other consequences appear possible.

One is a barrage of litigation from UK creators - and overseas owners who find their work Hoovered into extended collective licensing programs. International treaties allow a country to be ostracised and punished. The threat has already been made clear from US writers and photographers, who've promised "a firestorm". Reciprocal royalty arrangements can also be suspended, on the basis of "if you steal our stuff, UK, we won't pay you". In addition, a judicial review, based on the premise that the Act gives Minister unconstitutional power over the disposal of private property, is not out of the question.

Secondly, the disappearance of useful material from the internet is likely to accelerate - the exact opposite of what supporters wish for. We recently highlighted the case of an aerial photographer who's moving work outside the UK, and we've heard of several who are taking their photos away from the web, and into lockers. The internet is poorer without a diverse creative economy - because creators need legal certainty of property rights.

And finally, there's the macroeconomic consequences for the UK economy.

The notorious 'Google Review' chaired by Ian Hargreaves failed to undertake adequate impact assessments, a giveaway that even the most rabid "copyright reformers" recognise there isn't an economic case to be made for taking everyone's stuff and giving it away.

"There's value in works, and if anybody can exploit them except the person who creates them, then value is transferred to the exploiter," explains Ellis. "This is a massive value transfer out of the UK economy to US tech companies."

Where it will remain, he thinks, because UK tech/media companies - should they appear - almost invariably become US-owned.

Copyright "reformers" of course rarely like to talk about such unpleasant matters - and will steer the conversation away from economic consequences as rapidly as possible. Indeed, the they generally talk using Orwellian euphemisms - like "liberalising" or "rebalancing" copyright. It's rarely presented as an individual's ability to go to market being removed. This is what "copyright reform" looks like in practice.

"It's corporate capitalism," says Ellis. "Ideally you want to empower individuals to trade, and keep the proceeds of their trade. The UK has just lost that."

So while the Twitterati and intelligentsia were ranting away about "Big Content", we've just lost the ability to sell our own content. In other words, you've just been royally fucked. ®

READ MORE Facebook Flickr Copyright Uk.Gov Instagram

WHAT YOU NEED TO DO IS NOW READ THE BELOW FOR SOME ANSWERS AND WATCH THE YOUTUBE VIDEO AT TE BOTTOM.
If you want to register your work start by putting in all your information into your files from your camera menu. This includes your full name, address, phone number then in adobe bridge add image title with image file number, make sure your date is on. The more you set up in your camera menu the less you have to do.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WlLS7cUiFeQ
532 clicks
Ken Piros

Monthly Theme- April 2013 – It’s all there in Black and Whi

29.04.13, 22:49
1,207 clicks
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