General

<12345 ... 86>
General Discussions and Small Talk
Discussion Last answer Replies / Clicks
Ken Piros

June 2015 Monthly Theme – Story Behind the Image

SIZE MATTERS!

Practical Photography 101: You can never take along TOO many cameras.
Well, one guy's opinion...

A June late afternoon was transitioning into evening as I walked across the Manhattan Bridge from Lower Manhattan’s Chinatown to Brooklyn. My equipment included my D-SLR, as well as two film cameras, and...

Sometimes, as the expression goes, “size matters” – even when…small! The high security fences along the bridge’s walkways are not what one would call photography-friendly, in terms of being able to poke the typical camera lens through for a clear shot at the enticing cityscapes beyond the chain mesh.

That’s where the cute little zoom lens on my unassuming little Digital ELPH came in mighty handy. It was put to (I think) good use while the “big guys" in my pack awaited their turn to aim at more accessible vistas (as in upwards)

I loved the way a little bit of nature's greenery managed to stubbornly assert itself amidst the harsh urban textures and graffiti of Lower East Side Manhattan. And glad for having the "little guy" with teensy-tiny lens barrel, so well suited to the occasion.
292 clicks
Rob Nagelhout

Section Critique - straight and tough

Hi friends and other members on FC, as you can see I upload my pictures in the section "Critique - straight and tough" to get serious critiques and tips to improve my work. In my humble opinion the way to do but also in that section the comment are very lovely. Some members have had critiques on my work and were afraid that it would get me angry. I've explained them that I appreciate honest critiques because I want to learn more from other photographers and then only compliments won't do. Now I hope more members will enter that section because critiques doesn't hurt. I hope to see many uploads in that section because for now I see 3 maybe 4 people in that part of FC. And don't get me wrong because it's not my intention to hurt somebody. I'm also willing to help when needed. So give it a try
gr.Rob
63 clicks
Donata Casiraghi

Creativity

I believe that there is no drug as addictive or as alluring as being successful creatively. To make a living from the fruits of one’s imagination is truly a blessed way to live. But herein lies the rub. With practice, and perhaps success, we find our groove. But grooves frequently become ruts, and ruts can become trenches, and trenches can become graves in which our creativity becomes buried. – Vincent Versace

There are time our creativity just flows, images and thoughts pop up as fast as we can put the image to pixel nirvana, other times we get stuck in the quagmire of writers block. Some people put a lot more creativity into their image while others capture a scene that is merely presented to them while walking the streets of life.

Creativity is subjective like all art. Sometime the creativity is what we see and capture in camera, other times our creativity is in our abilities in Photoshop.

Creativity is either captured naturally or manufactured in our ability to manipulate an image. Some argue as a purist others as a digital artist.

There are things you do to get paid, 9-5, and other things you do to express yourself. Sometimes the line is blurred.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nDXkd2NyCCE

Who is right ? Who is wrong ?
107 clicks
BrianTyler

Image Sharpness Problems

You can easily test your camera and lens for sharpness using a white piece of paper (use a good quality printer paper)
Draw a skinny line with a pencil on the paper.
Photograph it using normal day light, no flash.
Camera on a tripod, vibration reduction set to off.
Open the image using Imager.
I created Imager for my students and it can be downloaded from my web site for free.
http://www.MyCIGroup.com then navigate to Imager.
It is not great looking software but serves the purpose for research!
Open the image and save it to text file.
Open the text file using EXCEL.
Scroll down until you find the Grayscale section. For each pixel there is one number listed.
Find the transition from white to black. It should look something like 175 175 175 70 60 55 55 55 55
This may vary in numbers, which is not important. It all depends on how white the paper is and how dark the line is.
Again, this is not important.
Count the number of pixels it took to transition from white to black. In my example above it took 3 pixels.
This transition is what humans interpret as sharpness or in focus. If it takes 5, 6, 7 pixels to transition, then the image is less sharp. Measure it.
Repeat the test by taking the camera out of autofocus, change aperture, etc. You will soon understand your camera.
A standard 35 mm camera will not transition in 1 pixel, it should be 2 to 3 pixels.

A couple of things to consider, keep the distance just far enough to allow the camera to focus properly. I would say 6 feet. Experiment with zoom settings but don't try to macro the object. That defeats the purpose of the test.
08.05.15, 04:42
You can easily test your camera and lens for sharpness using a white piece of paper (use a good quality printer paper)
Draw a skinny line with a pencil on the paper.
Photograph it using normal day light, no flash.
Camera on a tripod, vibration reduction set to off.
Open the image using Imager.
I created Imager for my students and it can be downloaded from my web site for free.
http://www.MyCIGroup.com then navigate to Imager.
It is not great looking software but serves the purpose for research!
Open the image and save it to text file.
Open the text file using EXCEL.
Scroll down until you find the Grayscale section. For each pixel there is one number listed.
Find the transition from white to black. It should look something like 175 175 175 70 60 55 55 55 55
This may vary in numbers, which is not important. It all depends on how white the paper is and how dark the line is.
Again, this is not important.
Count the number of pixels it took to transition from white to black. In my example above it took 3 pixels.
This transition is what humans interpret as sharpness or in focus. If it takes 5, 6, 7 pixels to transition, then the image is less sharp. Measure it.
Repeat the test by taking the camera out of autofocus, change aperture, etc. You will soon understand your camera.
A standard 35 mm camera will not transition in 1 pixel, it should be 2 to 3 pixels.

A couple of things to consider, keep the distance just far enough to allow the camera to focus properly. I would say 6 feet. Experiment with zoom settings but don't try to macro the object. That defeats the purpose of the test.
263 clicks
To the
top