General Discussions and Small Talk
Discussion Last answer Replies / Clicks
Rob Wells

Competition

Oh yes, I'm like Steve Ovett's and Forrest Gump's love child.

That BBC competition is complete pants you realise. They display the pictures too small, and after submission you stand only a snow-balls chance in hell of ever causually seeing it again. Apparently, because they have so many submissions, they only ever show 1500 random shots if you start to browse the gallery.

And I'll be f**ked if they think I'm gonna watch BBCi on the off chance they care to show one of mine.

I even emailed them to tell them it was pants...they never replied and I just felt that little bit older: -

"Dear BBC,

Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah
Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah
Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah
Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah

Yours sincerely,

Irate from Kent"

Its the sort of letter that my grand-dad would have written. Oh the shame!!
64 clicks
Rob Lamper

Membership and use of fotocummunity.

Hi Rob!
I'm sorry that you want to quit, surely I think it would have been good for the fotocommunity to have you here. So I didn't write comments to your pictures (I was on holidays and wrote very few comments the last weeks) I noticed them as some good work.
As for the causes you give I think I'll have to disagree in some parts.
It's true that really constructive critics are rare, critisizing means also to say what one don't like, and saying that might also scare away new members. Personally I like to get an impression of the author first before saying things which are negative (pooh, very poor formulation but I think you understand what I mean). Please consider also that it's summertime, and I have an impression that many of those who are giving constructive critics are on holiday just now... I myself have had some really usefull discussions here and am sure, that I could improve my skills a lot.
What you say about the size of the fotocommunity, so I disagree as long as it concern .com. I, too, think that the .de page is too crowded, but here on .com I'd like to see more activity. Anyway, it is important to "filtrate" the "input" after your personal taste, and you can do this with the "Buddy"-function. Mark photographers whose work you like as "Buddies", and you can have a closer and easier look on their work. But sure, it takes some time to go through all the pictures, but it's also sure that that's common in all such kind of communities.
Off course there are problems, no such a site will be perfect, but let's try to make the best of it...
I really hope that your decision to leave is not your final decision...
Greetings from Norway, Martin
21.07.05, 16:19
Hi Rob!
I'm sorry that you want to quit, surely I think it would have been good for the fotocommunity to have you here. So I didn't write comments to your pictures (I was on holidays and wrote very few comments the last weeks) I noticed them as some good work.
As for the causes you give I think I'll have to disagree in some parts.
It's true that really constructive critics are rare, critisizing means also to say what one don't like, and saying that might also scare away new members. Personally I like to get an impression of the author first before saying things which are negative (pooh, very poor formulation but I think you understand what I mean). Please consider also that it's summertime, and I have an impression that many of those who are giving constructive critics are on holiday just now... I myself have had some really usefull discussions here and am sure, that I could improve my skills a lot.
What you say about the size of the fotocommunity, so I disagree as long as it concern .com. I, too, think that the .de page is too crowded, but here on .com I'd like to see more activity. Anyway, it is important to "filtrate" the "input" after your personal taste, and you can do this with the "Buddy"-function. Mark photographers whose work you like as "Buddies", and you can have a closer and easier look on their work. But sure, it takes some time to go through all the pictures, but it's also sure that that's common in all such kind of communities.
Off course there are problems, no such a site will be perfect, but let's try to make the best of it...
I really hope that your decision to leave is not your final decision...
Greetings from Norway, Martin
57 clicks
Sheila Young

White eye reflection in children's photos

Actually my goal in getting in to your site was to advance my
campaign to let people know about the "white eye" reflection in children's
and babies' photographs (instead of the typical red eye). This white eye is
a tell tale sign of eye disease! In some cases, being alert to this sign
can save a baby's eyesight, or, even his life. I am trying any way I can to
try to spare other babies and children the devastating circumstance that
befell my infant grandson, James.
Born January 25th this year, he lost his left eye to save his life on May
4th. A retinoblastoma tumor had already detached his retina and threatened
quick metastasis to his brain and spine. If we had been alert to this sign,
a photo at 4 weeks of age would have sent us urgently to the doctor to have
his eyes examined! That would have caught this tumor in an earlier stage
an, probably, saved his eye from having to be removed. We discounted the
white 'spark" in his left eye as a reflection of the track lighting in his
home. Looking at the photo in retrospect, we enlarged it and saw clearly
that it was not a spark, but the dreaded sign of "leukocoria" that is eye
disease, in his case, retinoblastoma, an aggressive childhood cancer.
The fact that this mutilation was totally preventable is heart-wrenching and
moves us to try to warn others of this phenomenon.
We are also working hard to have it become a standard of care in the medical
community to dilate babies' and children's eyes in the hospital nurseries
and at their well baby/well child doctor visits and use and opthalmoscope in
a darkened room to examine their eyes as a screening test for eye disease.
This is an easy way to avoid the devastating loss of vision caused by
delayed detection eye disease.
Any help you can give on spreading this word would be greatly appreciated!
Granny Sheila Young
sheila.young3@sbcglobal.net

Forum List | Threaded View
05.07.05, 19:16
Actually my goal in getting in to your site was to advance my
campaign to let people know about the "white eye" reflection in children's
and babies' photographs (instead of the typical red eye). This white eye is
a tell tale sign of eye disease! In some cases, being alert to this sign
can save a baby's eyesight, or, even his life. I am trying any way I can to
try to spare other babies and children the devastating circumstance that
befell my infant grandson, James.
Born January 25th this year, he lost his left eye to save his life on May
4th. A retinoblastoma tumor had already detached his retina and threatened
quick metastasis to his brain and spine. If we had been alert to this sign,
a photo at 4 weeks of age would have sent us urgently to the doctor to have
his eyes examined! That would have caught this tumor in an earlier stage
an, probably, saved his eye from having to be removed. We discounted the
white 'spark" in his left eye as a reflection of the track lighting in his
home. Looking at the photo in retrospect, we enlarged it and saw clearly
that it was not a spark, but the dreaded sign of "leukocoria" that is eye
disease, in his case, retinoblastoma, an aggressive childhood cancer.
The fact that this mutilation was totally preventable is heart-wrenching and
moves us to try to warn others of this phenomenon.
We are also working hard to have it become a standard of care in the medical
community to dilate babies' and children's eyes in the hospital nurseries
and at their well baby/well child doctor visits and use and opthalmoscope in
a darkened room to examine their eyes as a screening test for eye disease.
This is an easy way to avoid the devastating loss of vision caused by
delayed detection eye disease.
Any help you can give on spreading this word would be greatly appreciated!
Granny Sheila Young
sheila.young3@sbcglobal.net

Forum List | Threaded View
47 clicks
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