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Sheila Young

White eye reflection in children's photos

Actually my goal in getting in to your site was to advance my
campaign to let people know about the "white eye" reflection in children's
and babies' photographs (instead of the typical red eye). This white eye is
a tell tale sign of eye disease! In some cases, being alert to this sign
can save a baby's eyesight, or, even his life. I am trying any way I can to
try to spare other babies and children the devastating circumstance that
befell my infant grandson, James.
Born January 25th this year, he lost his left eye to save his life on May
4th. A retinoblastoma tumor had already detached his retina and threatened
quick metastasis to his brain and spine. If we had been alert to this sign,
a photo at 4 weeks of age would have sent us urgently to the doctor to have
his eyes examined! That would have caught this tumor in an earlier stage
an, probably, saved his eye from having to be removed. We discounted the
white 'spark" in his left eye as a reflection of the track lighting in his
home. Looking at the photo in retrospect, we enlarged it and saw clearly
that it was not a spark, but the dreaded sign of "leukocoria" that is eye
disease, in his case, retinoblastoma, an aggressive childhood cancer.
The fact that this mutilation was totally preventable is heart-wrenching and
moves us to try to warn others of this phenomenon.
We are also working hard to have it become a standard of care in the medical
community to dilate babies' and children's eyes in the hospital nurseries
and at their well baby/well child doctor visits and use and opthalmoscope in
a darkened room to examine their eyes as a screening test for eye disease.
This is an easy way to avoid the devastating loss of vision caused by
delayed detection eye disease.
Any help you can give on spreading this word would be greatly appreciated!
Granny Sheila Young
sheila.young3@sbcglobal.net

Forum List | Threaded View
05.07.05, 19:16
Actually my goal in getting in to your site was to advance my
campaign to let people know about the "white eye" reflection in children's
and babies' photographs (instead of the typical red eye). This white eye is
a tell tale sign of eye disease! In some cases, being alert to this sign
can save a baby's eyesight, or, even his life. I am trying any way I can to
try to spare other babies and children the devastating circumstance that
befell my infant grandson, James.
Born January 25th this year, he lost his left eye to save his life on May
4th. A retinoblastoma tumor had already detached his retina and threatened
quick metastasis to his brain and spine. If we had been alert to this sign,
a photo at 4 weeks of age would have sent us urgently to the doctor to have
his eyes examined! That would have caught this tumor in an earlier stage
an, probably, saved his eye from having to be removed. We discounted the
white 'spark" in his left eye as a reflection of the track lighting in his
home. Looking at the photo in retrospect, we enlarged it and saw clearly
that it was not a spark, but the dreaded sign of "leukocoria" that is eye
disease, in his case, retinoblastoma, an aggressive childhood cancer.
The fact that this mutilation was totally preventable is heart-wrenching and
moves us to try to warn others of this phenomenon.
We are also working hard to have it become a standard of care in the medical
community to dilate babies' and children's eyes in the hospital nurseries
and at their well baby/well child doctor visits and use and opthalmoscope in
a darkened room to examine their eyes as a screening test for eye disease.
This is an easy way to avoid the devastating loss of vision caused by
delayed detection eye disease.
Any help you can give on spreading this word would be greatly appreciated!
Granny Sheila Young
sheila.young3@sbcglobal.net

Forum List | Threaded View
37 clicks
Rob Wells

Time and Motion

I have no real routine at all. When I'm on holiday the camera goes everywhere with me [except surfing of course :-)]. Other than that unless I'm going out somewhere specifically to take photos I rarely carry my camera.
Probably for many of the reasons already mentioned, feel a bit daft when you get funny looks for carrying a camera, lack of nerve to ask permission etc, but also because I guess I'm just lazy, I know I ought to make the time but it's just too easy to sit in front of the tv or my PC after work.

Right you've inspired me Rob, I will go out at the weekend a take some photos, there's a Harley Davidson Club camping at the Rugby Club this weekend an ideal opportunity.

[provided I can find the nerve to ask :-)]
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