Photography Accessories, lenses, tripods ...
Discussion Last answer Replies / Clicks
When

Looking for suppliers of FINE ART papers for digital ink jet

Someone else recommended them to me too Ruud. Hear they make a great selection of media. I was also sent a very long list of papers that fit my new printer. AMAZING!! Paper (or whatever media you print on) is such a big part of the experience of photography.

What I really am looking for is paper that has irregularities, dimples, texture, feathering on the edges and hopefully variations of thickness. Basically would like to find paper deckled on all sides. I can make my own paper if I have to, got lots of paper to make pulp and tons of laundry lint that would do nicely, don't really want to though. Very messy and time consuming. I'm hoping to find someone that maybe is making acid free archival level hand pressed pulp paper that is maybe compatible with the printer. I am hoping for different colors with irregular grain that I can tear and collage. For somewhat of an idea of what I am going for you can see Ernestine Ruben's American Landscapes in Platinum http://www.ernestineruben.com/Portfolio ... ?GP=5&IM=1

I found a company that carries Japanese paper, but a bit fussier than I want. Found some great papyrus, would love to find some true vellum too. Would be tickled to death if I found some onion skin. I want to do some transparent and layering. More artsy fartsy multi media and historical than straight photographic prints. I still need the good quality print paper for the regular stuff too.
194 clicks
Jenn Matthews

fashion light question

Thanks
30.03.06, 16:42
Thanks
149 clicks
Jit Ping Leong

question about astro photography..??????

If you want to picture the Moon (or the Sun) you need a quite strong tele, I would say at least 300mm are necessary. There are quite cheap foil-filters to make a sun-filter - but don't expect to see solar flares or such spectatcular things.
If you picture the moon, the full-moon usually gives the *worst* pictures, since there are no shadows visible therefore it looks more like a flat disk then a sphere. An ISO-100 film at around 1/25s and f/8 should give proper results with 300mm. If your camera has a Mirror-Lockup-function, you should use it (see my test: http://home.fotocommunity.de/mschopfer/ ... &d=1539951).

If you want to picture the Milkiway or star-trails, you can use a normal or even wide-angle lens. Avoid any type of light pollution (streetlights, nearby villages or even cities, the moon...).
In case you want to picture the milkyway you should use a faster film 400 or even 800, amd a fully opened aperture sice you want to collect as much light as possible in a relativeley short time (namely before the movement of the staes - resp. the rotation of the earth - becomes visible). So smaller the focal-lenght so longer exposure times are possible. Also keep in mind, that stars near the celestial equator moves faster then stars near the celestial poles - therefore you can use longer exposure times if your camera points to the north or south (near the horizon) as if it points to the east or west.

With a small focal length it's even possible to build a simple self-made mount which allows a manual tracking for longer exposure times. Or there are even Tracking systems for cameras on the market (http://www.scsastro.co.uk/library/skymemo.pdf).
07.02.06, 13:20
If you want to picture the Moon (or the Sun) you need a quite strong tele, I would say at least 300mm are necessary. There are quite cheap foil-filters to make a sun-filter - but don't expect to see solar flares or such spectatcular things.
If you picture the moon, the full-moon usually gives the *worst* pictures, since there are no shadows visible therefore it looks more like a flat disk then a sphere. An ISO-100 film at around 1/25s and f/8 should give proper results with 300mm. If your camera has a Mirror-Lockup-function, you should use it (see my test: http://home.fotocommunity.de/mschopfer/ ... &d=1539951).

If you want to picture the Milkiway or star-trails, you can use a normal or even wide-angle lens. Avoid any type of light pollution (streetlights, nearby villages or even cities, the moon...).
In case you want to picture the milkyway you should use a faster film 400 or even 800, amd a fully opened aperture sice you want to collect as much light as possible in a relativeley short time (namely before the movement of the staes - resp. the rotation of the earth - becomes visible). So smaller the focal-lenght so longer exposure times are possible. Also keep in mind, that stars near the celestial equator moves faster then stars near the celestial poles - therefore you can use longer exposure times if your camera points to the north or south (near the horizon) as if it points to the east or west.

With a small focal length it's even possible to build a simple self-made mount which allows a manual tracking for longer exposure times. Or there are even Tracking systems for cameras on the market (http://www.scsastro.co.uk/library/skymemo.pdf).
223 clicks
To the
top